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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 103 (some duplicates have been removed)
himself to be arrested and put in the birmingham, alabama jail cell where he read a newspaper that quoted moderate what energies as saying that thewere extreme and untimely. at the time, he wrote an eloquent letter in response. sociology professor jonathan rieder has taken a closer look at that pivotal document in a new o'connell the "gospel of treating -- in a new look called "gospel of freedom." we start by asking what it was that made you want to dissect this letter. i at the most basic level, have always been drawn to the letter. it has a aureus complexity. kingee the high-minded with these fancy philosophic notions and you also see one bristling with indignation. one moment he is taking you in to a voyage deep into the white southern soul -- i wonder who worships there and who is their god? then he takes whites into the recesses of like boehner ability. it is fast -- recesses of black vulnerability. i felt i needed to say more about the tough substance of dr. king. in many ways, "letter from birmingham jail" is his fullest statement about race in america. if you know how to read the
of the beginning. we'll revisit martin luther king's birmingham campaign 50 years later. a store i have next and one you'll only find here in "the war room." ♪ >> michael: your eyes are not deceiving you, and this is not historic footage from 1963. this is the kluwe -- kkk held a rally to protest the changing of three confederate parks. the march incident that lead to ugly and violent confrontations brought nationwide at attention to disenfranchised southern blacks. and that lead to local governments finally change their jim crow laws. our next guest, diane mcwhorter's new book "carry me home". her 2001 historical book won depulitzer prize. she joins us from cambridge massachusetts tonight. diane welcome inside "the war room." >> thank you so much, michael. >> michael: tell me something, you were about the same age as the four little girls -- they weren't all the same age -- but in that ballpark who died in the church bombings. how did that affect you at the time? >> one of the reasons i was moved to write my book is i never hear about the church bombings, and then i
>>> coming up, 50 years ago in birmingham, alabama, thousands of school children braved police dogs, fire hoses and arrest to march against segregation. >> it was about having a dream of a better day. >>> and is there a connection between god and baseball? bob faw reports. >>> major funding for "religion & ethics news weekly" is prov e provided by the lily endowment dedicated to its founders' interests in religion, community development and education. addition funding prod by mutu ofamerica, designing customized individual group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome, i'm deborah potter, sitting in for bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. u.s. muslim leaders this week condemned the deadly bombing in boston as more details emerged about the suspects. officials have described the tsarnaev brothers as motivated by religious extremism, but said they did not have ties to terrost orgizations. some attention has focused on a boston mosque where the suspected bombers occasionally prayed, after reports
ago, this april, in birmingham, alabama, martin luther king jr. was arrested for organizing a civil rights demonstration. he spent eight days in jail, and in solitary confinement. it was there that he wrote his classic vigorous defense of nonviolent civil disobedience, his "letter from birmingham jail." this weekend in birmingham, christian leaders gathered to apologize for 1960's era moderates who had urged king to be patient and not permit direct confrontations. they also urged people of faith today to continue doctor king's anti-racism campaign. >> we have to come together and say, what is the agenda that we share? for fixing what's broke. fixing broken people, broken families. broken nations. broken cities, broken communities. >> it was in his letter from birmingham jail, that dr. king wrote -- injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. >>> finay, legendary gospel singer george beverly shay died this week at the age of 104. shay became famous as the featured soloist at billy graham crusades. during his 80-year career, he recorded more than 70 albums of hymns and wrote
, followers killed in birmingham and selma. he was stabbed once in harlem at a book signing. >> when they removed the knife blades, they left a scar in his chest shaped like a cross. >> a cross he saw in the mirror each day when he got up. >> he said, every morning when i brush my teeth i know this day might be my last, so i'm ready for whatever comes any day of my life. >> he joked about death with his inner circle. >> he'd always say, they are going to be shooting at me, but one of you will be jumping in front of the camera to take the bullet for me. and he said, i'll appreciate it, and then i'll preach the best funeral you've ever heard or anybody ever heard. then he'd start preaching. preaching your funeral. he would never let us get nervous about it. and i don't think he was nervous about it. >> but it was there? it was very real? >> it was there particularly from the moment john kennedy was killed. he just assumed that inevitably, if they could not protect the president, there's no way we could be protected. >> this photo was taken in 1966 on an earlier visit to memphis. at kin
in birmingham, alabama, a group of students took their lives and their futures into their hands when they marched into the deep south of racial hatred. tonight we'll talk to one of them. documentaries... on current tv. >> michael: 50 years ago hundreds of students in birmingham alabama, marched to protest the city's is he agrees gas stationist policies. beginning on may 2 1963, young people poured out of their classrooms and met at the baptist church right there in birmingham. their goal was to meet with the mayor. instead they were met with fire hoses and police dogs ordered by the police commissioner eugene connor. they were hauled off to birmingham jail. the horrifying images of young people being attacked on the evening news served as a wake-up call to americans really throughout the world about segregation in this country. with at the tonight is one of the courageous young people who participated in the march. james was a high school student at the time. he went on to work with black awareness who recruited black students for college. it's an honor to having you tonight, james.
to the east it's punishing some of the places in its path. that includes birmingham, alabama, where we get our report from nbc's gabe gutierrez. >> it's coming toward us. >> reporter: a massive tornado barrelled across mississippi this afternoon, killing at least one person and injuring several others. dozens of homes and businesses in kemper county destroyed. preliminary reports say the tornado was on the ground for 56 miles. >> on radar we saw extremely violent signature with this. we saw tornado debris signatures with this. we have seen video of the big wedge or big cone-shaped tornado. >> we have seen houses split in half. >> reporter: at daybreak in missouri and arkansas today, the first look at damage caused by tornadoes and high winds. trees tossed like matchsticks. sonny martin's family barely made it out alive. >> i basically told her to run and get the baby. >> reporter: gusts up to 100 miles per hour reported in some areas in northern arkansas. >> it's breathtaking what a storm like this can do. these are pieces of people's lives that are just scattered across the area. >> reporter:
the story. >> late night in birmingham, the climax of the biggest counterterrorism operation of recent years. this was the moment the three would-be suicide bombers were taken off of the streets. finally, the ringleader. sentencing him to life in prison, the judge said he was a highly skilled bomb maker whose beliefs were at the far end of the extreme. he was his right-hand man, albeit of low intelligence. the planned mass murder together said the judge sentencing him to 18 years. he was at the epicenter of the fund-raising efforts and was sentenced to 15 years. for months, the men had been watched by the police. irgs were planted in they were heard planning to de up to eight bombs. they talked about turning parts of birmingham into a war zone. they described themselves as suicide bombers driving around ready to take on england. >> they were very critical of the 77 bombers in terms of not killing enough people. they wanted to kill a lot of people. they aspired to their 9/11. they wanted to go down in history as doing that. >> this picture shows the ringleader and another man returning to the
. >> testily could be moving to birmingham they have expressed interest in relocating its electronic -- electric car sales and services who is from menlo park to birmingham. on monday the city's planning is set to vote on a permit for the company their rival says i'd have fired about wondered 60 employees that equals about 75% of its workforce. the move is being described as a last-ditch effort to conserve cash and put off a potential bankruptcy filing. the company's flagship vehicle is the 100,000-dollar karma plug-in hybrid. >> target customers in new york were offended by the color description on a plus sized address. the tag on the dress show the color as manatee gray apparently referring to the huge marine animals. smaller sizes of the address listed the same color as dark heather gray. targa called the labeling an unintentional oversight and has pulled the dress. santa rosa police are looking for a man who robbed a bank this morning police said the man of the surveillance video robbed a chase bank on ord street around 11:20. investigator
of birmingham in the uk. and you see a ton of cars here with ra ta ton of spectators. this person with the arm start to get the race started is this little person here. >> is that a child? >> that is, in fact, a child that is placed in front of these cars that are about to go more than 100 miles an hour to start the race. in this video, you see an adult holding the child, showing the child how to start the race. and then walked away and let's the kid do it alone. >> that's a dangerous place for anybody to be, let alone a young child. i would call that child endangerment the. >> and that is why the police department started an operation last year to crack down on these races. and in this other part of the video, we see one car running to another car that's right in front of it. it's showing out out of control things can get so quickly. because of this footage captured on hidden cameras as part of this ragz, about 250 of these drivers were taken to court. they were fined sometimes as much as $3,000. and they be banned from driving on the streets for about two years. according to reports, racing
16th street baptist church in birmingham, alabama, 50 years ago this year. 1963 was a pivotal year in the struggle for civil rights in our nation. it marked 100 years after the emancipation proclamation and was the year of martin luther king jr.'s stirring letter from the birmingham city jail which sounded the call for nonviolent civil obedience to counter oppression in the jim crow south. in that letter, dr. king famously proclaimed, in justice anywhere is a threat -- injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. mr. speaker, as the veteran of those efforts, i know that the struggle for justice, empowerment and equal opportunity for all continues to this day. i want to thank my colleague, representative terri -- 10 seconds -- terri sewell. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for 30 seconds. mr. clyburn: i want to thank my colleague, representative terri sewell for her leadership in this outstanding effort, representative sewell has quickly made her mark in this institution for her tireless devotion to duty and her thoughtful approach to legislating. i am p
visit the town of troy, visit montgomery for tuskegee or birmingham, the white man, colored men, white women and my mother and father asked my grand parents and recruited parents, wife? they said that the way it is. don't get in the way. don't get in trouble. when they heard about rosa parks and the safety or loaded in the 10th grade. i heard about martin luther king jr. in 1957. became the next year in 1958 at the age of 15. my folks can't seem to get in trouble. dr. mengele. rosa parks and martin luther king jr. inspired me to find a way to get in the way. i was so inspired the 1956 at the age of 16, with my brothers and sisters and cousins at the public library and troy, alabama trying to get library cards. trying to check out books. i never went back to that library until july 5th, 1998 with my buck, "walking with the wind." [applause] hundreds of blacks and white came. we had a wonderful program. food, something to eat, some to drink. at the end of the program, they gave me a library card. it says something that the distance we've come in the progress made. some of you in my book,
. we'll talk to the mayor of birmingham, alabama, ask ask him how he's weathering the storm in his home state. it's monday. a brand new start. your chance to rise and shine. with centurylink as your trusted technology partner, you can do just that. with our visionary cloud infrastructure, global broadband network and custom communications solutions, your business is more reliable - secure - agile. and with responsive, dedicated support, we help you shine every day of the week. to appreciate our powerful, easy-to-use platform. no, thank you. we know you're always looking for the best fill price. and walk limit automatically tries to find it for you. just set your start and end price. and let it do its thing. wow, more fan mail. hey ray, my uncle wanted to say thanks for idea hub. o well tell him i said you're welcome. he loves how he can click on it and get specific actionable trade ideas with their probabilities throughout the day. yea, and these ideas are across the board -- bullish, bearish and neutral. i think you need a bigger desk, pal. another one? traders love our trading pattern
this nation and world in celebrating dr. martin luther king's letter from a birmingham jail. after being arrested on april 12, 1963 dr. king came across an article in the birmingham news, entitled white clergymen urge local negros to withdraw from demonstration. clergymen who authored that article were very critical of dr. king and the others who demonstrated, they called the demonstrations untimely and unwise. . he penned a letter upon his release. the letter became one of the most preeminent documents of the civil rights era. so today i join the voices around the world as i read in part from this beautifully written masterful document, letter from a birmingham jail by dr. martin luther king jr. 16, april, 1963. my dear fellow clergy. while confined here in the birmingham county jail, i came across your recent statement calling my present activities unwise and untimely. seldom do i pause to answer criticisms of my work and ideas. if i sought to answer all the criticisms across my desk, my secretary would have little time for anything else. but since i feel that you are men of genuine go
of the birmingham bombing and we could get search warrants for his mobile home, a storage shed and once we started seeing what was in the facilities, we could piece together not only birmingham but atlanta that have been two years earlier. up until that point* the folks in atlanta who had done a fabulous job had no idea who eric rudolph was. it took piecing physical evidence together to make the case. neil: there ought to be 100 more like you. not to blow you smoke but thank you very much. crackdown, so many bad guys decades after the fact. talk about boston in those
wear that number again. baseball is a wonderful pastime in my district of birmingham, alabama, where we have a minor league team, and enjoy baseball. without reserve, -- without resolve, i ask for passage of 1071, and i reserve the balance of my time and urge my colleagues to approve this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from alabama. mr. bachus: mr. speaker, i now yield two minutes to the gentleman from new york, mr. hanna, who's the sponsor of this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for two 10 minutes. -- for two minutes. r. hanna: i thank the chairman emeritus for yielding and for supporting this bill. the united states mint is working hard to produce spectacular coins. next year, honoring the national baseball hall of fame 70th anniversary. as called for in the legislation i authored in last year's congress, the coin will be unique in the history of the mint. it will be domed, and with the back of the coin depicting stitches that appear on a major league baseball. in doing the production work, the mint
as a teenager. so i spend a lot of time among the members after-school -- i mean, and a program in birmingham's university of alabama birmingham quarterback power. speaking of that, there is a program in east birmingham called studio by the tracks which provides after-school arts programs and opportunities for troubled teenagers and children with various united way type needs. as concerned as i am -- >> could you get to your question please. >> i'm sorry. i cannot seem to make these people about gun rights and gun ownership and so forth who in the debates ever since, you know, the shooting in connecticut in november realize that criminals getting their hands on guns and firearms comes from a completely different cause blowing up without their fathers and without other significant male role models as children. we have had decreased federal and state dollars for united way agencies and public school boards after-school programs. -- >> you know what, we got your point. we appreciate your calling in. and louise rodriguez, if you could take what she was saying. >> i think what he's saying is you n
. that the people who staged the sit-ins, the young children in birmingham, they made the movement possible. and i think that this is a extremely important as we commemorate martin luther king. now, also in the 50 years since the march on washington, some amazing things have happened, in my life and many of the lives of the people in this room. if someone had come to me at the march and said, guess what, in about a dozen years you'll be teaching african-american history at stanford university. i would have said, yes, and i'll be living on mars also. because many of you know that that was an inconceivable dream for a 19 year old at that point. or in two decades coretta scott king would call me and edit the papers of her late husband. or in three decades that i would be asked to join this team roma design right here in san francisco and design the king national memorial. and i would be going back to the mall where i was as a 19 year old as one of the 2 million people who were there for the first inauguration of president barack obama. and just a year later, a couple of years later, going back there
. 14 horas de recorrido no alcanzaron para birmingham alabama y washington dc. en el trayecto han encontrado todo tipo de obstáculos. no parecen afectar el animo del grupo nos junio estamos los grupos en varios autobuses, vamos en caravana rumbo a washington y es una experiencia placentera para todos nosotros. el pasajero más pequeños no cumple un año la más grande presume de sus 65. vienen de todas partes, principalmente de méxico, honduras y el salvador. todos avanzan a un objetivo común sobre todo para que haga una reforma mi dpra tri para todos frmiento para los 11 millones de indocumentados que vivimos en las sombras. >>> desde temprano los primeros rayos del sol a lum brarn la llegada de los pasajeros 1 a 1 acomodaron maletas y provisión para el viaje. para muchos, el primero luego de años de permanecer escondidos. y su hermano vick to de 21 son veteranos en la lucho de los derechos de los migrantes en su estado. haber conseguido su estancia legal en el país. voy a pelear por mis papás y tus restos. todos. nos quedan un par de horas de camino. de todo lo que ocurr
've met, i was in birmingham, alabama, recently and i met a mother whose daughter fortunately did not take her own life but it was such a scare and she's put in place a number of programs and i found myself in awe of her. but at the same time, i come from a family of doctors, actually, i'm the only lawyer. all my 4 siblings were
spotted at an airport in birmingham. >> we're working in close cooperation with law-enforcement parker's across the nation to gather information and follow-up investigation. i would encourage the public to continue to call and into a social media, particularly twitter and facebook and to just get the word out. >> preliminary investigation said she altered her periods as well as her sons in order to attempt to avoid being located. he said they disappeared in 2011 and ended up in los angeles. tensions remain high in the north korean peninsula with a possible missile launch following weeks of threats from north korea. the north is celebrating the birthday of its founder. john gonzalez is live in the newsroom. he has more on the reaction of this living threat. >> it is a big threat. as north korea celebrates that it did a good holiday its young leader is promising an all-out war with the u.s.. secretary of state john kerry says there's still hope for peace but remains on high alert. >> john kerry says the u.s. prepared for direct talks with north korea if kim jong-un makes a move to abando
it was found outside the boardinghouse. >> the rifle, the one ray bought in birmingham, is on display today. upstairs in the rooming house, now part of the national civil rights museum run by beverly robertson. it's got a scope on the top. >> yes, he had a scope on it. i think he felt he needed a scope, but it was a very short distance. you didn't need to be a marksman or a sharpshooter to be able to hit the target. >> it was an easy shot. >> it was an easy shot. i bet you or i could have made that shot. >> across at the lorraine motel, witnesses had pointed to the back of the boardinghouse. >> so we went up there, got to the top of the steps and there was a little lady there, and she appeared to be deaf, dumb. she was doing like this. it was like she was shooting a rifle, and she pointed to the bathroom at the end of the hallway. >> in the bathroom, the police captain found the window open, its screen knocked out. >> you could see exactly to the motel where dr. king had been shot. >> he went to find the landlady. >> i asked her who was renting this room, and she went and got a receipt book
are working safely. >> testily could be moving to birmingham they have expressed interest in relocating its electronic -- electric car sales and services who is from menlo park to birmingham. on monday the city's planning is set to vote on a permit for the company their rival says i'd have fired about wondered 60 employees that equals about 75% of its workforce. the move is being described as a last-ditch effort to conserve cash and put off a potential bankruptcy filing. the company's flagship vehicle is the 100,000-dollar karma plug-in hybrid. >> target customers in new york were offended by the color description on a plus sized address. the tag on the dress show the color as manatee gray apparently referring to the huge marine animals. smaller sizes of the address listed the same color as dark heather gray. targa called the labeling an unintentional oversight and has pulled the dress. santa rosa police are looking for a man who robbed a bank this morning police said the man of the surveillance video robbed a chase bank on ord street around 11:20. investigators say he handed the teller a n
for the 1963 bombing of the baptist church in birmingham that ultimately killed for african-american girls. bottom line, you do not mess with mr. jones because he is tenacious. and i am very odd to have you with us. >> thank you. neil: that was my immediate concern. i don't know if we are making the league. obviously the fbi does is research. technology. licking their residue for a backpack to a similar colors. people wearing similar backpacks. i understand all that. but these guys have already been called the bombers by the media apart from just as suspects. risk that they are not? >> yes. certainly there is a risk, but think we have, years from the 1996 olympic park bombing in which richard jewell was really not declared a suspect in a press conference the you saw here. a lot of media leaks from law-enforcement at the time. and he was started more because of a profile that he seemed to fit rather than physical evidence. neil: but i remember, you know, i do remember a rush. we have to find the guy, we have to find the yakima and i'm not saying authorities given to that and are less zealou
.org. today marks the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king, jr.'s letter from a birmingham jail for it was written as a response to one alabama clergy who criticized king's actions during the birmingham campaign, a series of nonviolent sit ins and marches held to protest racial segregation. this is dr. king reading a pa of a letter he wrote in jail after he was arrested for defying a judge's ban on protests. >> you speak of our activity as extreme. was not jesus an extremist for love? bless them that curse you and pray for them which despite fully persecute you. we be extremists for the preservation of injustice, for the extension of justice. >> that was from the film "king ." those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with aaron matÉ. >> welcome to all our listeners and viewers from around the country and around the world. bombing from monday's at the boston marathon stands at three dead and 144 wounded, 17 critically. it was the worst bombing since the oklahoma city attack of 1995. wereber of children
that martin luther king jr. wrote his letter from a birmingham jail. king was in jail for leading nonviolent direct action protests against racial segregation in birmingham. and while in jail, he received a public statement of caution and concern written to him by eight white religious leaders of the south. they were moderates, but they edg urged him to wait and to proceed with caution. king's letter was originally meant to be just a response to this small group. but after he put down his pen, king had written the manifesto of the civil rights movement, a compassionate and philosophical defense to unjust laws. king wrote, there comes a time when the cup of endurance runs over and men are no longer willing to be plunged into the abyss of does pair. he went on to say more and more people of ill will have used time much more effectively than the people of good will. so celebrate this classic document of american thought and the five decades of progress that have followed in its wake. the birmingham public lish -- on tuesday, as a reminder that our continuing struggles are interconnected, people
in detail. >> woodruff: now there's a dispute. the university of alabama at birmingham which was the lead hospital out of, i guess, 23 medical institutions that were engaged in this study, they are saying that throughout this trial they -- that physicians conformed to what's called the standard of care but public citizens, the criticism is, that they did not provide -- they did not stay within the band of so-called standard of care. how is that going to be resolved? >> well, they did stay within the band of standard of care as measured by these two -- this range of hemoglobin saturation, namely 5% to 95%. babies who are not in a trial like this, the physician conferring with the parents usually decides some place where in that range the doctor and the parents think might be best. and actually it's somewhat hard to keep infants from -- at one percentage of saturation. they tend to bounce around. but the -- even though that is the standard band of care there is not enough knowledge to know what is the sweet spot in that -- in that range of 85% to 95% and this trial was trying to find that s
of the ku klux klan bombed the birmingham alabama church where they were worshipping. the pictures of these four girls puts a devastating new face on the country's racial terrorisms. today in washington, the house of representatives will move one step closer to posthumously awarding them with the congressional gold medal. joining mess is congresswoman terry sewell, also joining me is diane braddock, the sister of carol robertson, one of the girls who was killed in that bombing. ladies, good morning. congresswoman, i want to start with you. explain how this measure came about to want to move ahead with this ceremony? >> you know, it's a long overdue recognition, in this the 50th anniversary year, the alabama delegation came together, both republicans and democrats, we thought it was very important and befitting that we acknowledge and honor the lives of addie mae, carol, cynthia, as well as denise mcnair. so that's what we wanted to do. it's the 50th anniversary, a long time overdue. i'm just honored that dianswer and lisa mcnair, the sister of denise, are here with us and will be i
the birmingham jail. i've seen that all the time, people who are i think in their core good people who don't know what to do who tend to send the paradigm that boys will be boys and girls will be girls and we're trying to shift that paradigm. and that's why in okahenapen we have an accountability document that calls for --. >> (inaudible) with the idea, like i said, there is not a state going that we don't have a parent that has a dead child. we are dragging everybody to the party because at what point do we say, we can't even say, kids are dying. hundreds and hundreds of children have died when this should be the best times of their life and our most sensitive, compassionate, empathetic, our children are not surviving their childhood. >> one thing i've learned in my line of work, and again i want to thank you for your remarks and your doggedness, civil rights is about persistence. you exude persistence. i have attempted to live a persistent life. the civil rights act of 1964 was first introduced in 1948, took a little while. the hate crimes of 2009 was first introduced in 96, took so
, is the 1963 king was arrested and put in a birmingham jail. so were dozens of his very young followers. >> we were getting such pressure from the parents of the children to bail their children out. >> that is when actor hairy belafonte arranged for jones to meet with nelson rock feller who handed jones bail money, $100,000 from a family vault. >> he opened the door look inside of the vault. interest there is from floor to ceiling money. >> by now, dr. king's nonviolent movement had taken off. the next stop was nation's capital for the march on washington. jones helped draft part of the speech king deliver there'd in august, 1963. but towards the end of the speech, king heard a voice. >> then there, came a point where as he's speaking his favorite gospel singer performed earlier shouts to him as is he at the lecturn tell them about the dream, martin. tell them about the dream. >> king put the speech to the side and began improvizing. >> very a dream. >> so, the speech which he -- had is celebrated the i have a dream portion was never written. it was spontaneously spoken. and given. >> among pe
was in birmingham, alabama, recently and i met a mother whose daughter fortunately did not take her own life but it was such a scare and she's put in place a number of programs and i found myself in awe of her. but at the same time, i come from a family of doctors, actually, i'm the only lawyer. all my 4 siblings were doctors, i promised them i'd never be a plaintiff's personal injury lawyer and i kept my promise. but when i heard this very earnest person talk about how she's invested so much time and energy into bullying, i found myself asking, how do we know it's working? there are a lot of things that seem intuitively plausible and appear to be anecdotally moving the ball forward, but we need to move beyond that. we need to, among other things, figure out what indeed are practices that work and we need to understand in so doing that what may work in sioux falls may not work in san francisco. we get that. so solutions need to be taylored to local communities, solutions need to reflect the fact that there are many, many dimensions to this issue. let me tell you about the few dimensions
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 103 (some duplicates have been removed)